Notes from An Alien

~ Explorations In Reading, Writing, and Publishing ~

Should Writers Even Consider They Can Help Cure Social Problems?


Many can be found who would scoff at a writer considering their fiction could be of aid in any attempt to address social issues, let alone curing any ills of our culture.

In the previous post, Do Creative Writers Have Social “Responsibilities”?, I asked these questions:

“What are the ‘moral’ or ‘ethical’ opportunities in a creative work?”

“What is the creative person’s ‘responsibility’ to society?”

In the post, Fiction and Social Justice ~ Can They Coexist?, I asked:

“Should writers of fiction consider devoting their talents to portraying moral actions in the face of social injustice?”

“Does fiction have sufficient influence in readers’ lives to serve as inspiration for taking steps toward social justice?”

And, in Writing Fiction To Make A Difference In The World I asked:

“Can action done in our world to improve it have the power to inspire creative writers to produce socially-responsive fiction?”

I have a number of methods to help me find things worthy of inclusion in this blog.

A Google Alert sent me to investigate a publication called The Curator.

Of course, “Curator” usually means something like, “a keeper or custodian of a museum or other collection”.

Though, the word comes from a Latin root meaning “Cure”.

And, since I’ve raised the whole issue of creativity and social responsibility, let me quote a bit from The Curator‘s About Page:

The Curator…announces the signs of a ‘world that ought to be’ as we find it in our midst, and seeks to inspire people to engage deeply with culture that enriches life and broadens experience.

“In keeping with [the] belief that artistic excellence, as a model of ‘what ought to be’, paves the way for lasting, enduring humanity, The Curator seeks to encourage, promote, and uncover those artifacts of culture—those things which humans create—that inspire and embody truth, goodness, and beauty. We do this through considering and grappling with the zeitgeist.”

And, these words from the founder of The Curator, Alissa Wilkinson:

“Why another culture magazine?….

“We aren’t here to write simple reviews. After all, if you want to find out which movies are bad, which artists are lazy, or which movements are socially irresponsible, you can read the review section of any good newspaper or magazine. Instead, we seek to uncover only the creative, the good, and the honest, provide context for its existence, and explain its cultural significance in order to inspire you to engage your culture and start creating.”

Does The Curator sound like a publication you’d like to peruse?
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Our Comment Link Is At The Top of The Post :-)
For Private Comments, Email: amzolt {at} gmail {dot} com
* Google Author Page

2 responses to “Should Writers Even Consider They Can Help Cure Social Problems?

  1. Barbara Blackcinder August 8, 2012 at 7:53 am

    Very nice link to “The Curator”, too bad Sorina Higgens is so dead set against self-publishing and thinks that getting an agent and publishing with a “reliable publishing company” is the absolute only way to be published. Other than that the article was interesting, as well as many other articles on the magazine.

    Like

    • Alexander M Zoltai August 8, 2012 at 8:24 am

      Well, Barb, some folks, I believe, have different life-circumstances that lead to different takes on the same information that leads some folks to radically different conclusions…</b

      Something like that—this response is my first conscious activity this Morn :-)

      Like

What Are Your Thoughts or Feelings?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,235 other followers